Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters

For a while I’d been wanting to make the snowflake puffy paint window clings that I’m sure a lot of you have seen. Sophia and I tried those out as instructed on wax paper. I’m not sure if the paint or the wax paper wasn’t good enough quality but they stuck to it badly. I figured we’d give the window clings another shot and try it out on a plastic Ziploc bag. I decided to change it up and we made some monsters instead. I love them and Sophia absolutely loves making them! There’s no guidelines to follow just mixing paint as we pleased. Way more room for creativity and exploration just perfect for a toddler.

Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters

What you will need:

  • Puffy fabric paint
  • Coffee stir sticks (or some other “stick”, long tooth pick would do as well)
  • Gallon size Ziploc bag
  • Scissors
  • Wet wipes (for clean up)
  • Baking sheet
  • Googlie Eyes

Set up: I first cut the Ziploc bag completely open (on three sides) so it opens up and lines the cooking sheet.

Ready to Make Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Ready to Make Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters

I had Sophia put on her painting smock because it is after all paint for fabric. I felt it to better be safe than sorry.

Pile of paint
Pile of paint

Make a pile of paint, mix and spread it out with your “stick” and place eyes on.

Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters

As always I recommend having wet wipes nearby for when you get paint on your hands.

Making the smiley face :)
Making the smiley face πŸ™‚

First I demonstrated one to Sophia on how to mix the paint by swirling with the mini straw. And sticking googlie eyes on after I was happy with my paints.

And off she went. Mixing paints and adding googlie eyes as the pleased πŸ™‚

Making Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Making Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Making Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Making Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters

The dry time is pretty long with it being on a plastic bag. It’ll dry to the touch within a few hours however under the googlie eyes it will still remain wet for a lot longer. I let them dry out three days. You can check on the back side by pushing at the paint under the eyes, if you feel paint move give them more time.

Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters

Once you’re certain they are dry you can peel them off. Gently using your fingernail peel the edge up. Once you get the first little bit up they peel off really easily. They are ready to stick on your window.

Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters

The rest of the pictures I took at night so you could see them better.

Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters

This one reminds me of Anger from Inside Out movie πŸ™‚

Liquid Watercolor Coffee Filter Pumpkins

Liquid Watercolor Coffee Filter Pumpkin Sun Catcher
Liquid Watercolor Coffee Filter Pumpkin Sun Catcher

I’ve been wanting to do something festive for the fall season. Originally I was thinking that we could make the pumpkins in to Jack-O-Lanterns by cutting faces on them, but then decided against it since Sophia’s scissor skills aren’t up to that task yet.

What you will need:

  • Liquid watercolors (can be replaced with food coloring)
  • Cups for your watercolors
  • Pipettes (you can get ones from your pharmacy)
  • Coffee filters
  • Scissors
  • Pencil
  • Wet wipes (for clean up)
  • Baking sheet
  • Cling wrap
  • Oven (not necessary)
Liquid Watercolors
Liquid Watercolors

Set up: Place a cling wrap on your baking sheet.

I chose to use red, orange, yellow, and brown liquid watercolors for our pumpkins. For each of the colors in a cup I put about a 1/4 inch of water and added a bit of the watercolor in.

So excited!
So excited!

First I sketched a pumpkin shape in pencil on to a filter that I wanted to use as a template. Cut out several filter pumpkins at the same time to with the template until you have cut out as many as you want to make. Place pumpkins on top of the cling wrap on the baking sheets. I put 2 pumpkins on top of each other (one pile had 3, we made sure to put extra paint on that one) since I only had 2 baking sheets to use and didn’t want to try to transfer wet filters.

Painting away
Painting away

I found these spill proof paint cups on Walmart.com and I’m happy to say they worked great. I love that they come with lids so you can store paint in them as well.

Fun squirting paint
Fun squirting paint

Let your child explore and mix colors to their hearts content.

Fun mixing colors
Fun mixing colors
Wet Painted Pumpkins
Wet Painted Pumpkins

The colors will be more vibrant when wet. You want to make sure there is plenty of paint on the filters unless you are looking to have very muted colors.

All painted!
All painted!

I placed the pumpkins in the oven to dry, with just the oven light turned on for a small source of heat. I wanted the end results to be as vibrant in color as possible, so I wanted all the paint to dry on to the coffee filters. It took about 5 hours for the hearts to fully dry.

TIP: You can remove the pumpkins off the cookie sheets and set to dry on a dry surface. Note that the colors will not be as bright if you do this though.

Drying out in the oven with the light on
Drying out in the oven with the light on

Once the filters have dried you can tape them on to a window and the sun will light them up beautifully.

Liquid Watercolor Coffee Filter Pumpkins Ready to Hang Up
Liquid Watercolor Coffee Filter Pumpkins Ready to Hang Up
Liquid Watercolor Coffee Filter Pumpkin Sun Catcher
Liquid Watercolor Coffee Filter Pumpkin Sun Catcher

Easy Fast Cheap Easter Bunny Craft (sun catcher)

I found this at Hobby Lobby on sale for 40% off. I picked it up since I always have my eye out for simple fast in-expensive crafts.

Easter Craft kit
Easter Craft kit

I was a bit surprised that what I had thought was a paint brush was actually a plastic pick.

Easter Craft kit came with a pick not a brush
Easter Craft kit came with a pick not a brush
Testing out a new method of painting
Testing out a new method of painting

It’s always fun to explore new things and ways to paint.

I set up painting projects in trays to contain potential messes.

TIP: Have wet wipes handy for easy clean up

Fun painting
Fun painting

Sophia’s finished Easter Bunny.

Easter Bunny all painted
Easter Bunny all painted

Primary color mixing experiment with coffee filter snowflakes and heart-flakes

I love the color wheel and love seeing what colors you get from mixing paints. This was the perfect project to let Sophia experience the wonder.

Finished snowflakes
Finished snowflakes

This is a project I’ve been dying to try out with the liquid watercolors… you can substitute food coloring or even cake watercolors (you would need paint brushes for this option).

What you will need:

  • Liquid watercolors/food coloring
  • Cups for your watercolors
  • Pipettes
  • Coffee filters
  • Scissors
  • Wet wipes (for clean up)
  • Baking sheet
  • Tinfoil
  • Oven (not necessary)
Heart-flakes and snowflakes cut out
Heart-flakes and snowflakes cut out

Flatten, fold and cut out your snowflakes to your liking from the coffee filters.

I cut out 3 filters on top of each other in the heart shape and 4 together on the snow flake. For painting them I placed them on the baking pan 2 on top of each other (I didn’t think Sophia would have the patience to repeat the process 7 times and 4 seemed just right). One of the heart ones was on the pan singly (for the math minded πŸ˜‰ )

Ready to experiment with primary colors
Ready to experiment with primary colors

I diluted the liquid watercolors quite a bit. I put about a 1/4 inch of water on the bottom of the cups and then added the paint to my liking.

Below is a time lapse video of Sophia having fun squirting and mixing the paints together.

So much fun mixing colors
So much fun mixing colors

All done with the first set.

Snowflakes ready to dry
Snowflakes ready to dry

The second set got more brown as she liked putting all the paint in one spot.

Heart-flakes ready to dry
Heart-flakes ready to dry
Drying in the oven with the light on for heat
Drying in the oven with the light on for heat

I placed them in the oven to dry, with just the oven light turned on for a small source of heat. I wanted the end results to be as vibrant in color as possible, so I wanted all the paint to dry on to the coffee filters. It took about 5 hours for the hearts to fully dry.

TIP: You can remove the snowflakes off the cookie sheets and set to dry on a dry surface. Note that the colors will not be as bright if you do this though.

The colors dry a lot lighter
The colors dry a lot lighter

It’s crazy how much less vibrant the colors are after they dry.

TIP: If you want to get some of the wrinkles out, place them in side a book. Each snowflake on their own separate page and then place a weight (or more books on top). Let sit over night.

Love how these snowflakes turned out
Love how these snowflakes turned out

Once dry they are ready to tape to your windows.

My favorite one
My favorite one
Snowflake and heart-flake in the window
Snowflake and heart-flake in the window

Liquid watercolor doilies

Red hearts ready to dry
Red hearts ready to dry

I received liquid watercolors for Christmas and have had this project in mind ever since. I’m so glad we finally got to try them out and it was an instant hit πŸ™‚

Finished hearts
Finished hearts

What you will need:

  • Liquid watercolors
  • Cups for your watercolors
  • Pipettes
  • Doilies of your liking
  • Wet wipes (for clean up)
  • Baking sheet
  • Cling wrap
  • Oven (not necessary)

I found these spill proof paint cups on Walmart.com and I’m happy to say they worked great. I love that they come with lids so you can store paint in them as well.

materials
Materials

Set up: Place a cling wrap on your baking sheet.

I chose to use red liquid watercolor for our first batch. In one cup I put about a 1/4 inch of water and added a bit of the watercolor in. The second cup I poured undiluted watercolor in (as you can see above, in a lot smaller quantity).

Too excited to start
Too excited to start

Separate the doilies so you only have one in each spot. Our pan fit six nicely.

Got the doilies separated
Got the doilies separated

I let her have one of the paint cups at a time. It fits nicely on the baking sheet to help keep mess down. I had her do the diluted one first since it is easier for her to get the paint in the pipette by herself.

So exciting to squirt paint :)
So exciting to squirt paint πŸ™‚
Mid squirt
Mid squirt

After she got done with the diluted version of paint I let her have the undiluted cup. With that she asked me to help her a few times to fill it up.

Red hearts ready to dry
Red hearts ready to dry

It’s ok if the hearts have white spots on them. There is plenty of paint underneath the doilies that will soak up in to them.

Admiring her hearts
Admiring her hearts
Blue hearts
Blue hearts

We repeated the process with the blue liquid watercolor.

Already a pro
Already a pro
Mid squirt
Mid squirt
Blue hearts ready to dry
Blue hearts ready to dry

You can see the darker blue spots in the picture above (the undiluted paint)

Ready to dry
Ready to dry

After sitting out for a while you can see the doilies absorbed the paint underneath them.

I placed the hearts to dry in the oven
I placed the hearts to dry in the oven

I placed the hearts in the oven to dry, with just the oven light turned on for a small source of heat. I wanted the end results to be as vibrant in color as possible, so I wanted all the paint to dry on to the doilies. It took about 5 hours for the hearts to fully dry.

TIP: You can remove the doilies off the cookie sheets and set to dry on a dry surface. Note that the colors will not be as bright if you do this though.

Finished hearts
Finished hearts

You will notice the color variations on all the hearts. I love how they turned out πŸ™‚

TIP: After you are done and cleaning up you can put your undiluted paints back in the original container. I saved the 2Β  diluted paints in the spill proof containers to use in later projects.

Love hand-print painting <3

This is my favorite art project from 2014 we did. (I only have this one picture of it.) We did this as a family project since Sophia was only about a year and a half old at the time. So having an extra person helping definitely keeps the mess contained better.

Love hand print painting!
Love hand print painting!

What you will need:

  • Acrylic paint
  • Water color paper
  • Paint brushes
  • Painters tape
  • Razor knife
  • A cup with water for setting dirty paint brushes in
  • Wet wipes (for easy clean up)

Tape the word you want on to the paper. Trim it with the razor knife to your liking. Paint your little one’s hand and have them place it over the paper. Repeat in as many colors as you like.

TIP: You want to make sure all the edges of the tape have some paint or it wont show up. (You can see the top corner of the L disappear).

Pine Cone Holiday Penguin!

Holiday pine cone penguin!
Holiday pine cone penguin!

What you will need:

  • A Pine Cone
  • Black tempera paint
  • Paint brush
  • hot glue gun and glue stick
  • Black, White and Red Felt for making tummy/face, wings, and a hat (or buy a hat pre-made)
  • Googlie eyes
  • Orange pipe cleaner
  • Wet wipes (for cleaning)
Santa Hats
Santa Hats

I was planning on making a Santa hat out of felt for our pine cone penguin, until I found these cute Santa hats on sale at Hobby Lobby for 50% off.

Paint the pine cone black
Paint the pine cone black

First paint the pine cone black and let the paint dry.

TIP: If you the squeeze the paint directly on the pine cone and then spread it with a brush, it is easier to do than putting the paint on a plate and having to scoop it up with the brush.

Things to make a holiday pine cone penguin!
Things to make a holiday pine cone penguin!

Cut the white felt in a oblong 8 figure as shown in the picture above. Cut two wings out of the black felt. If you are making your own Santa hat make it before you start on the penguin.

Penguin's beak and feet
Penguin’s beak and feet

Cut a small part off the orange pipe cleaner and bend it in a “V” shape for the beak. Then take the remaining piece and bend 3 toes on each end as shown in the above picture.

Ready to hot glue!
Ready to hot glue!

Plug in your hot glue gun and let it heat up.

Gluing the face first!
Gluing the face first!

Start with gluing the face first on to the white felt piece.

Then take the pine cone and glue the white felt piece on as desired. After that glue the hat and wings on as desired.

Penguin's feet glued on
Penguin’s feet glued on

On the bottom of the pine cone glue on the feet as shown above.

Pine Cone Holiday Penguin!
Pine Cone Holiday Penguin!

Enjoy your new Holiday Penguin πŸ™‚

Penguin love
Penguin love <3
Pine Cone Holiday Penguin and Rudolf!
Pine Cone Holiday Penguin and Rudolf!

Instructions for Rudolf here.

Our holiday pine cone friends πŸ™‚

Holiday pine cone friends
Holiday pine cone friends

Instructions for pine cone Santa click here

Instructions for the painted tree click here

Instructions for the salt dough ornaments click here

Potato Stamping Christmas Cards!

Toddler Potato Stamping Christmas Cards
Toddler Potato Stamping Christmas Cards

It’s the time of year to get your Christmas cards sent. We decided to make some this year. I figured for the most toddler participation, potato stamping would be the best option. (I didn’t want to have Sophia only be interested in making one or two cards and all the rest left to me)

Free hand Christmas tree stamp
Free hand Christmas tree stamp

What you will need:

  • A large potato
  • A large knife (to cut the potato in half)
  • A small knife (for carving)
  • Cookie cutters
  • Tempera paints
  • Foam brushes
  • Card stock paper for cards
  • A paper cutter
  • A cup with water for setting dirty paint brushes in
  • Wet wipes (for easy clean up)

First cut your potato in half. Then cut out designs as wanted. I wanted to use cookie cutters on both but the tree cookie cutter I have was too big for the potato, so I ended free handing it.

When using a cookie cutter press it in to your potato half about a quarter inch. Then take your knife and cut away the potato to the cookie cutters edges.

Use a cookie cutter to cut out the stamp
Use a cookie cutter to cut out the stamp

Cut the card stock paper in half to a desirable size card. We decided we wanted our cards to fold open with a stamp on the outside and a stamp on the inside.

Ready for Potato Stamping Christmas Cards
Ready for Potato Stamping Christmas Cards

Put some tempera paint on your stamp with a foam brush. You don’t want to put the paint on too thickly or it will just smear.

TIP: Practice a few stamps on a scrap sheet of paper to figure out a good amount of paint for the stamp.

Excited to start stamping!
Excited to start stamping!
So amazed! :)
So amazed! πŸ™‚

Place the stamp on the card and press firmly down on it before removing from paper.

Allow the first stamp to dry before stamping the inside of the cards.

Ready to stamp candy canes
Ready to stamp candy canes

I tried to make striped candy canes with red and white but it just blended together in to pink candy canes.

Stamping the candy canes
Stamping the candy canes

Allow paint to dry. Then they are ready to write in or decorate further if desired. Sophia drew pictures and added some stickers to ours πŸ™‚

Painting fabric!

Painted fabric!
Painted fabric!

This is so much fun! It’s all about the process and experimenting with paint and new textures.

What you will need:

  • White cotton fabric. (TIP: You could use pre-made napkins if you wanted to)
  • Acrylic paint
  • Cups (for watering down paints)
  • Regular paint brushes
  • Foam brushes
  • Packaging tape
  • Wax table cloth (the paint will go through the fabric and on to the surface below it) Or something else to protect your table
  • A cup with water for setting dirty paint brushes in
  • Wet wipes (for easy clean up)
Painting acrylics on fabric
Painting acrylics on fabric

Set up:

Cut a piece of fabric to a manageable size, this is about 12″x18″. Then tape down the 4 corners to the work surface.

Since I have 4 foam brushes, it made sense to me to dilute 4 different colors for Sophia to use. So in a cup squirt a dime size amount of paint and then add about 1/4 cup of water and stir together to mix the paint into the water. You can add more paint if you want the color to be more vivid.

Repeat until you have several cups of diluted paints.

Have all the supplies in easy reach and you are ready to let your little one experiment and paint.

Toddler abstract art in process
Toddler abstract art in process

The process:

Start with undiluted acrylics, and let your little one decide the colors and how much they want to paint on. We use regular paintbrushes for the undiluted acrylics. These will show up the best and be the most vivid in the end result.

Diluted paints spread easier and will soak through the fabric
Diluted paints spread easier and will soak through the fabric

Once your little one has decided they are done painting with the non-diluted paints, move on to the diluted ones. Use the foam brushes for easy painting.

Painting watered-down acrylics on fabric
Painting watered-down acrylics on fabric

Sophia was amazed to see the paint “grow”, as she called it. πŸ™‚

You will want to cover all of the fabric piece with the diluted paints, even in the corners you have covered with the tape. For the corners theΒ  paint will spread under the tape and it will release itself off the fabric once its wet. Remove the tape and allow to dry.

Allow to dry completely.

If you chose to make napkins this is where you need to follow an extra step of heat setting your paint.

 

Painted fabric!
Painted fabric!

The Painted Tree

Our pastel painted branch!
Our pastel painted branch!

I saw this fun idea on Babble Dabble Do blog for a rainbow tree.

From that day I was on a constant search for a branch that would work. It took several weeks since around where we live right now 99% of the trees are pines.

What you will need:

  • A branch of your liking
  • Acrylic paint
  • Paint brushes
  • Cup with water for setting dirty paint brushes in
  • Wet wipes (for easy clean up)
All set up to paint
All set up to paint

Cover your work surface. I tape (with painters or packing tape) the wax cloth directly on to the table so it doesn’t move around while we work.

Excited to paint :)
Excited to paint πŸ™‚
Painting our pastel tree
Painting our pastel tree

TIP: The foam paint brushes are the best for toddlers to work with on this project

Ready to flip over
Ready to flip over

Sophia was more interested in using a fewer colors over all covering larger areas.

It's great for hanging up crafts
It’s great for hanging up crafts

I placed rocks in a vase to hold up our tree. The tree is a really fun way to display some of our art work we do πŸ™‚

Snowflake the Elf all ready for mornign for Sophia to find her
Tree with our salt dough ornaments

(I painted the vase pink since I wasn’t a fan of the brownish red color it was before. )

How to make:

Cookie cutter salt dough ornaments here and decorating them here

Pine Cone Santa here

Counting down to Christmas with Elf on the Shelf with a toddler friendly version here