Color Books Recommended (baby to elementary school)

I don’t know about you guys but I’m always on the lookout for awesome books about color. I love vivid brilliant colors and beautiful pictures. You can never have too many colors books(… or books of any kind actually πŸ˜‰ ).

My favorite colors books from 9 months to 8+
My favorite colors books from 9 months to 8+ years

Here are my top 5 favorites I’ve found for a range of ages from baby to elementary school. I’m not an Usborne consultant (in case you wondered.) I just really love a lot of their large fantastic variety of non-fiction books (which I have had a really hard time finding for my non-fiction lover before I found Usborne) as well as their fiction ones too.

Usborne Baby's very first touchy-feely Colors Play book
Usborne Baby’s very first touchy-feely Colors Play book

First up is the Usborne Baby’s Very First Touchy-feely Colors Play Book. I love this one so much for many reasons.

Usborne Baby's very first touchy-feely Colors Play book
Usborne Baby’s very first touchy-feely Colors Play book

I love that there are a bunch of things to feel and do. There are cut outs, textures, finger trails and flaps to play with. I love the vibrant colors and illustrations on each of the pages. This book is age rated for nine months and up. This book and other play books similar to this for sale here https://t4783.myubam.com/252093.

Usborne Baby's very first touchy-feely Colors Play book
Usborne Baby’s very first touchy-feely Colors Play book

Second, is a book by DK publishing called My First Colors let’s learn them all.

My First Colors Let's learn them all!
My First Colors Let’s learn them all!

This book features bright vibrant colors and real pictures of objects. This is a fantastic vocabulary building book for toddlers.

My First Colors Let's learn them all!
My First Colors Let’s learn them all!

I love that this book goes beyond the typical colors and has silver, gold, and multi colored included.

My First Colors Let's learn them all!
My First Colors Let’s learn them all!

It’s a sturdy board book that will hold up well. It has tabbed corners that are great for little fingers finding their favorite pages. This book is available through Target.com as well as Amazon.com

My First Colors Let's learn them all!
My First Colors Let’s learn them all!
The Usborne Big Book of Colors
The Usborne Big Book of Colors

Third, is Usborne’s The Usborne Big Book of Colors. I think this is fantastic for older kids that have mastered the basic colors.

The Usborne Big Book of Colors
The Usborne Big Book of Colors

I absolutely LOVE that this book goes into shades of colors, naming them like magenta, turquoise, lime green, saffron, etc so it has tons of fabulous new vocabulary.

The Usborne Big Book of Colors
The Usborne Big Book of Colors

This one is recommended for age 2 and up. The pages are thinner board, so still sturdy yet slightly flexible.

The Usborne Big Book of Colors
The Usborne Big Book of Colors

Two special features this book has are a color wheel you can spin (not super sturdy, pictured in the first picture of this book above) and an acetate page where you can see color mixing (shown below).

I love that this book shows color mixing as well as moods and meanings of colors. Plus each color page has fun facts too. This book is available here https://t4783.myubam.com/252093

The Usborne Big Book of Colors
The Usborne Big Book of Colors

Fourth up is Usborne Lift the Flap Colors.

Usborne Lift-the-flap Colors
Usborne Lift-the-flap Colors

It is recommended for age 4 and up, however I think it would be fabulous for younger kids as well for building vocabulary, learning counting, and small motor skills with the flaps. The games and activities of this book are geared for pre-k.

Usborne Lift-the-flap Colors
Usborne Lift-the-flap Colors

I think this is a great early reader book. Flap books are very engaging and create a hands on learning experience which promotes decision making and critical thinking skills. This book is available here https://t4783.myubam.com/252093

Usborne Lift-the-flap Colors
Usborne Lift-the-flap Colors

Last up, is The Usborne Art Book about Color.

The Usborne Art Book about Color
The Usborne Art Book about Color

This book is rated for age 8+. It begins with a history of how paint has developed.

The Usborne Art Book about Color
The Usborne Art Book about Color

It then goes on to explain how colors are used to achieve desired effects. Then finishes with how our eyes actually see color. I love all the art in this book. I only took pictures of some of the pages (it has 48). This book is available here https://t4783.myubam.com/252093

The Usborne Art Book about Color
The Usborne Art Book about Color

Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters

For a while I’d been wanting to make the snowflake puffy paint window clings that I’m sure a lot of you have seen. Sophia and I tried those out as instructed on wax paper. I’m not sure if the paint or the wax paper wasn’t good enough quality but they stuck to it badly. I figured we’d give the window clings another shot and try it out on a plastic Ziploc bag. I decided to change it up and we made some monsters instead. I love them and Sophia absolutely loves making them! There’s no guidelines to follow just mixing paint as we pleased. Way more room for creativity and exploration just perfect for a toddler.

Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters

What you will need:

  • Puffy fabric paint
  • Coffee stir sticks (or some other “stick”, long tooth pick would do as well)
  • Gallon size Ziploc bag
  • Scissors
  • Wet wipes (for clean up)
  • Baking sheet
  • Googlie Eyes

Set up: I first cut the Ziploc bag completely open (on three sides) so it opens up and lines the cooking sheet.

Ready to Make Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Ready to Make Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters

I had Sophia put on her painting smock because it is after all paint for fabric. I felt it to better be safe than sorry.

Pile of paint
Pile of paint

Make a pile of paint, mix and spread it out with your “stick” and place eyes on.

Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters

As always I recommend having wet wipes nearby for when you get paint on your hands.

Making the smiley face :)
Making the smiley face πŸ™‚

First I demonstrated one to Sophia on how to mix the paint by swirling with the mini straw. And sticking googlie eyes on after I was happy with my paints.

And off she went. Mixing paints and adding googlie eyes as the pleased πŸ™‚

Making Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Making Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Making Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Making Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters

The dry time is pretty long with it being on a plastic bag. It’ll dry to the touch within a few hours however under the googlie eyes it will still remain wet for a lot longer. I let them dry out three days. You can check on the back side by pushing at the paint under the eyes, if you feel paint move give them more time.

Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters

Once you’re certain they are dry you can peel them off. Gently using your fingernail peel the edge up. Once you get the first little bit up they peel off really easily. They are ready to stick on your window.

Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters

The rest of the pictures I took at night so you could see them better.

Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters
Puffy Paint Window Cling Monsters

This one reminds me of Anger from Inside Out movie πŸ™‚

Liquid Watercolor Coffee Filter Pumpkins

Liquid Watercolor Coffee Filter Pumpkin Sun Catcher
Liquid Watercolor Coffee Filter Pumpkin Sun Catcher

I’ve been wanting to do something festive for the fall season. Originally I was thinking that we could make the pumpkins in to Jack-O-Lanterns by cutting faces on them, but then decided against it since Sophia’s scissor skills aren’t up to that task yet.

What you will need:

  • Liquid watercolors (can be replaced with food coloring)
  • Cups for your watercolors
  • Pipettes (you can get ones from your pharmacy)
  • Coffee filters
  • Scissors
  • Pencil
  • Wet wipes (for clean up)
  • Baking sheet
  • Cling wrap
  • Oven (not necessary)
Liquid Watercolors
Liquid Watercolors

Set up: Place a cling wrap on your baking sheet.

I chose to use red, orange, yellow, and brown liquid watercolors for our pumpkins. For each of the colors in a cup I put about a 1/4 inch of water and added a bit of the watercolor in.

So excited!
So excited!

First I sketched a pumpkin shape in pencil on to a filter that I wanted to use as a template. Cut out several filter pumpkins at the same time to with the template until you have cut out as many as you want to make. Place pumpkins on top of the cling wrap on the baking sheets. I put 2 pumpkins on top of each other (one pile had 3, we made sure to put extra paint on that one) since I only had 2 baking sheets to use and didn’t want to try to transfer wet filters.

Painting away
Painting away

I found these spill proof paint cups on Walmart.com and I’m happy to say they worked great. I love that they come with lids so you can store paint in them as well.

Fun squirting paint
Fun squirting paint

Let your child explore and mix colors to their hearts content.

Fun mixing colors
Fun mixing colors
Wet Painted Pumpkins
Wet Painted Pumpkins

The colors will be more vibrant when wet. You want to make sure there is plenty of paint on the filters unless you are looking to have very muted colors.

All painted!
All painted!

I placed the pumpkins in the oven to dry, with just the oven light turned on for a small source of heat. I wanted the end results to be as vibrant in color as possible, so I wanted all the paint to dry on to the coffee filters. It took about 5 hours for the hearts to fully dry.

TIP: You can remove the pumpkins off the cookie sheets and set to dry on a dry surface. Note that the colors will not be as bright if you do this though.

Drying out in the oven with the light on
Drying out in the oven with the light on

Once the filters have dried you can tape them on to a window and the sun will light them up beautifully.

Liquid Watercolor Coffee Filter Pumpkins Ready to Hang Up
Liquid Watercolor Coffee Filter Pumpkins Ready to Hang Up
Liquid Watercolor Coffee Filter Pumpkin Sun Catcher
Liquid Watercolor Coffee Filter Pumpkin Sun Catcher

Glitter, Sequins, and Plaster of Paris Ornaments

finished Moomin Troll ornaments
finished Moomin Troll ornaments

Sophia adores glitter so I came up with this project for her. When we started I wasn’t sure what we would make with the end results but we ended making them in to hanging ornaments πŸ™‚

Glitter and sequin Moomin Troll ornament
Glitter and sequin Moomin Troll ornament

What you will need:

  • Molds of your liking
  • Glitter
  • Sequins
  • Beads or anything else small like buttons, rocks, etc
  • Water
  • Plaster of Paris
  • Tray to contain the mess
  • A cookie drying rack
  • Ziplock bag
  • Measuring cup
  • Scissors
  • Mod podge
  • Ribbon
  • Paint brush
  • Tin foil
  • Hot glue gun and stick of glue
  • (Optional scale)
Things we used in the molds  (minus the googlie eyes, she didn't want any)
Things we used in the molds (minus the googlie eyes, she didn’t want any)
Excited to glitter!
Excited to glitter!
Small beads got poured in
Small beads got poured in

After the first mold was all done to her liking we moved on to the next.

TIP: In case of glitter spills, wet wipes and also play doh are great fast ways of picking up the strays

Excited to make Moomin Trolls
Excited to make Moomin Trolls
Mixing glitter
Mixing glitter
Adding sequins after she was satisfied with all the glitter
Adding sequins after she was satisfied with all the glitter
The last of the sequins got poured in
The last of the sequins got poured in

Once she was satisfied with all the glitter and sequins in the mold. We mixed up a batch of plaster. I didn’t think we would need a full one pound (It comes in one pound bags in the box), so we mixed first a half a pound and halved the recipe on the box.

TIP: Instead of using a bucket and a stick as the instructions on the box say, use a gallon ziplock bag to mix in. Sophia demonstrates how to mix in the bag below.

Once mixed just cut a small hole in one corner of the bag and pour it on the molds. I found that we were a little shy so we made another 4 oz (with the recipe quartered for water amount).

For the molds I used up 12 oz of the 1 pound bag of plaster
For the molds I used up 12 oz of the 1 pound bag of plaster

We were left with 1/4 pound of unused plaster.

Plaster poured in
Plaster poured in
Hearts plastered
Hearts plastered
Removed the ornaments out of the molds after they had set for about an hour, so they would dry better
Removed the ornaments out of the molds after they had set for about an hour, so they would dry better

I did remove the ornaments out of the molds after they had set for about an hour, so they would dry better. In the process I did break two of the Moomin Trolls arms off. But glue them back on once they dried with mod podge.

Mod podged ornaments to seal on the glitter and sequins
Mod podged ornaments to seal on the glitter and sequins

After the ornaments were dry I took a larger paintbrush and mod podged the tops and sides of them to seal in the glitter and sequins. I set them to dry on a sheet of tinfoil.

Hot glued ribbons on the Moomin Trolls
Hot glued ribbons on the Moomin Trolls

Sophia was happy to cut up all the ribbon pieces we needed. I hot glued them on. You have to let the glue cool before touching it or they do peel off pretty easy when wet yet.

Hot glued ribbons on the hearts
Hot glued ribbons on the hearts
Finished heart ornaments
Finished heart ornaments

All done!

finished Moomin Troll ornaments
finished Moomin Troll ornaments

Primary color mixing experiment with coffee filter snowflakes and heart-flakes

I love the color wheel and love seeing what colors you get from mixing paints. This was the perfect project to let Sophia experience the wonder.

Finished snowflakes
Finished snowflakes

This is a project I’ve been dying to try out with the liquid watercolors… you can substitute food coloring or even cake watercolors (you would need paint brushes for this option).

What you will need:

  • Liquid watercolors/food coloring
  • Cups for your watercolors
  • Pipettes
  • Coffee filters
  • Scissors
  • Wet wipes (for clean up)
  • Baking sheet
  • Tinfoil
  • Oven (not necessary)
Heart-flakes and snowflakes cut out
Heart-flakes and snowflakes cut out

Flatten, fold and cut out your snowflakes to your liking from the coffee filters.

I cut out 3 filters on top of each other in the heart shape and 4 together on the snow flake. For painting them I placed them on the baking pan 2 on top of each other (I didn’t think Sophia would have the patience to repeat the process 7 times and 4 seemed just right). One of the heart ones was on the pan singly (for the math minded πŸ˜‰ )

Ready to experiment with primary colors
Ready to experiment with primary colors

I diluted the liquid watercolors quite a bit. I put about a 1/4 inch of water on the bottom of the cups and then added the paint to my liking.

Below is a time lapse video of Sophia having fun squirting and mixing the paints together.

So much fun mixing colors
So much fun mixing colors

All done with the first set.

Snowflakes ready to dry
Snowflakes ready to dry

The second set got more brown as she liked putting all the paint in one spot.

Heart-flakes ready to dry
Heart-flakes ready to dry
Drying in the oven with the light on for heat
Drying in the oven with the light on for heat

I placed them in the oven to dry, with just the oven light turned on for a small source of heat. I wanted the end results to be as vibrant in color as possible, so I wanted all the paint to dry on to the coffee filters. It took about 5 hours for the hearts to fully dry.

TIP: You can remove the snowflakes off the cookie sheets and set to dry on a dry surface. Note that the colors will not be as bright if you do this though.

The colors dry a lot lighter
The colors dry a lot lighter

It’s crazy how much less vibrant the colors are after they dry.

TIP: If you want to get some of the wrinkles out, place them in side a book. Each snowflake on their own separate page and then place a weight (or more books on top). Let sit over night.

Love how these snowflakes turned out
Love how these snowflakes turned out

Once dry they are ready to tape to your windows.

My favorite one
My favorite one
Snowflake and heart-flake in the window
Snowflake and heart-flake in the window

Liquid watercolor doilies

Red hearts ready to dry
Red hearts ready to dry

I received liquid watercolors for Christmas and have had this project in mind ever since. I’m so glad we finally got to try them out and it was an instant hit πŸ™‚

Finished hearts
Finished hearts

What you will need:

  • Liquid watercolors
  • Cups for your watercolors
  • Pipettes
  • Doilies of your liking
  • Wet wipes (for clean up)
  • Baking sheet
  • Cling wrap
  • Oven (not necessary)

I found these spill proof paint cups on Walmart.com and I’m happy to say they worked great. I love that they come with lids so you can store paint in them as well.

materials
Materials

Set up: Place a cling wrap on your baking sheet.

I chose to use red liquid watercolor for our first batch. In one cup I put about a 1/4 inch of water and added a bit of the watercolor in. The second cup I poured undiluted watercolor in (as you can see above, in a lot smaller quantity).

Too excited to start
Too excited to start

Separate the doilies so you only have one in each spot. Our pan fit six nicely.

Got the doilies separated
Got the doilies separated

I let her have one of the paint cups at a time. It fits nicely on the baking sheet to help keep mess down. I had her do the diluted one first since it is easier for her to get the paint in the pipette by herself.

So exciting to squirt paint :)
So exciting to squirt paint πŸ™‚
Mid squirt
Mid squirt

After she got done with the diluted version of paint I let her have the undiluted cup. With that she asked me to help her a few times to fill it up.

Red hearts ready to dry
Red hearts ready to dry

It’s ok if the hearts have white spots on them. There is plenty of paint underneath the doilies that will soak up in to them.

Admiring her hearts
Admiring her hearts
Blue hearts
Blue hearts

We repeated the process with the blue liquid watercolor.

Already a pro
Already a pro
Mid squirt
Mid squirt
Blue hearts ready to dry
Blue hearts ready to dry

You can see the darker blue spots in the picture above (the undiluted paint)

Ready to dry
Ready to dry

After sitting out for a while you can see the doilies absorbed the paint underneath them.

I placed the hearts to dry in the oven
I placed the hearts to dry in the oven

I placed the hearts in the oven to dry, with just the oven light turned on for a small source of heat. I wanted the end results to be as vibrant in color as possible, so I wanted all the paint to dry on to the doilies. It took about 5 hours for the hearts to fully dry.

TIP: You can remove the doilies off the cookie sheets and set to dry on a dry surface. Note that the colors will not be as bright if you do this though.

Finished hearts
Finished hearts

You will notice the color variations on all the hearts. I love how they turned out πŸ™‚

TIP: After you are done and cleaning up you can put your undiluted paints back in the original container. I saved the 2Β  diluted paints in the spill proof containers to use in later projects.

Baby’s first edible finger paints! 9 Different Recipes :D

I was just recently asked how old Sophia was, when we started arts and crafts with her. Sophia’s first hands on art activity was finger painting. She was 8 months old. I made her edible finger paints to explore on water color paper, that I then later used for our Valentines Day cards. I did a ton of searching around and looked at different recipes. I have compiled a list of 9 different edible finger paint recipes that I found.

First finger painting
First finger painting

I used a 3 ingredient recipe that was just cornstarch, water, and food coloring. 1. The Imagination Tree has a good recipe for it here. (Cooking required)

First finger painting
First finger painting

As you can see in the pictures it is pretty chunky and a bit jello-like.

Chunky paints
Chunky paints

There are plenty of other kinds of edible finger paints. Some of them require cooking and a few do not.

2. Here’s one from Mom Tastic that uses flour, salt, sugar, and food coloring, link here. (Cooking required)

Exploring new textures and colors
Exploring new textures and colors

3. Here’s a jello based one from the Imagination Tree, link here. (Cooking required)

Sensory fun
Sensory fun

4. A yogurt based 2 ingredient recipe from Make and Takes, link here. (No cooking required)

Edible paint!
Edible paint!

5. Flour and salt based one from E how, link here. (Cooking required)

6. Here is a sugar and cornstarch based one from Dixie sugar, link here. (Cooking required)

7. Here is a pudding based one from Pop Sugar, link here. (Cooking required unless you buy the pudding already made)

8. This one is cornstarch and gelatin based from Invitation to the Butterfly Ball, link here. (Cooking required)

9. Here is a simple 3 ingredient one with flour, water and food coloring by Mama Ot, link here. (No cooking required)

I know I’ve seen a recipe that used some thing else to color the paints instead of food coloring but I’m not able to locate it. If you have other good recipes please leave a comment!

 

Love hand-print painting <3

This is my favorite art project from 2014 we did. (I only have this one picture of it.) We did this as a family project since Sophia was only about a year and a half old at the time. So having an extra person helping definitely keeps the mess contained better.

Love hand print painting!
Love hand print painting!

What you will need:

  • Acrylic paint
  • Water color paper
  • Paint brushes
  • Painters tape
  • Razor knife
  • A cup with water for setting dirty paint brushes in
  • Wet wipes (for easy clean up)

Tape the word you want on to the paper. Trim it with the razor knife to your liking. Paint your little one’s hand and have them place it over the paper. Repeat in as many colors as you like.

TIP: You want to make sure all the edges of the tape have some paint or it wont show up. (You can see the top corner of the L disappear).

Glue Batiks with a Toddler

 

Framed Butterflies
Framed Butterflies

I found this awesome idea on All Our Days blog. They had done two different variations and I combined the two together to make it easier for my daughter and still have a bunch of fun colors.

The Cat framed and ready to hang

Here isΒ All Our Days blog’s many day project they did one with non watered down paint, instructions here.

Here is their version of making solid colors with watered down paint in a spray bottle, instructions here.

Horse framed and hung on the wall
Horse framed and hung on the wall

I combined both painting methods for a faster project. I didn’t think I could get Sophia to keep interested in a project over many days and yet I wanted a bunch of different colors in our end results. Here is the instructions I wrote of just painting the fabric. (We made these for Christmas presents so I couldn’t post about this at the time πŸ˜‰ ).

What you will need:

  • White cotton fabric. (TIP: You could use pre-made napkins if you wanted to)
  • Elmers Glue Gel (the blue kind)
  • Tin foil (for underneath the fabric while gluing)
  • Acrylic paint
  • Cups (for watering down paints)
  • Regular paint brushes
  • Foam brushes
  • Packaging tape
  • Wax table cloth (the paint will go through the fabric and on to the surface below it) Or something else to protect your table
  • A cup with water for setting dirty paint brushes in
  • Wet wipes (for easy clean up)

If you want to frame them like I did you will also need the following:

Since I already posted about how to paint the fabric here.

I’ll just go into the glue portions of the project and framing in detail.

Glue Octopus
Glue Octopus

Place a piece of tinfoil under your fabric (as the glue will eventually soak through it). You can either free hand your designs or you can opt for finding templates to trace. I did two of each kind.

TIP: Leave at least an inch blank around the edges of your design for framing purposes

Glue Seahorse
Glue Seahorse

The Ocean Scene and Butterflies I did free hand.

Finished Ocean Scene
Finished Ocean Scene

TIP: The thicker you put the glue on the clearer the lines on the finished product will be.

The Horse image I found for a template
The Horse image I found for a template

This is the Horse picture I used as a template to trace with glue.

TIP: While tracing an image you will want to tape down the paper image and the fabric over the top of it so they don’t move.

When you are happy with your design allow it to fully dry before moving onto painting it.

Again instructions here for painting.

Painting the Butterflies
Painting the Butterflies
All painted and waiting for the paint to dry on the Ocean Scene
All painted and waiting for the paint to dry on the Ocean Scene
All painted and waiting for the paint to dry on the Butterflies
All painted and waiting for the paint to dry on the Butterflies
The Cat paint dried
The Cat paint dried

Don’t worry if you can’t really see the glue like in the cat picture above.

Fully dried paint and ready to soak in warm water
Fully dried paint and ready to soak in warm water

Once the paints have fully dried put the fabric fully submerged in to a bucket of warm water and let sit for about 20 minutes. The glue will begin to melt away. You can speed it up by rubbing the fabric together or scraping it with your fingernail. This is my favorite part, you get to see the art you just created with your little one!

Glue removed from the Ocean Scene
Glue removed from the Ocean Scene

Just washed Ocean Scene, still wet.

After you have all the glue removed hang up your fabric to air dry.

Once dry they are ready to frame. If you chose to make napkins this is where you need to follow an extra step of heat setting your paint.

 

Ironed and ready to frame
Ironed and ready to frame

Since it took me several months to figure out how to frame the fabric pieces, I needed to first iron all the creases out of them. Follow your irons guidelines for your fabric. I used misting and low heat for mine.

TIP: don’t let the iron sit in one spot too long as it may damage the paint.

Cut foam poster-board to size
Cut foam poster-board to size

I finally settled on using poster-board for the framing. Use your razor knife and cut a piece to size. You will want to leave about an inch on all sides for wrapping.

Cut a small "V" to the corner
Cut a small “V” to the corner

Put a bead of hot glue down the first edge of the poster board push the fabric firmly on it. Glue a second bead on the opposite side and pull the fabric taught before pushing it down on the glue bead.

Next cut a “V” in to the fabric where the corner of the board is. That way it wont bunch up when you glue the corners down.

Fold the over hanging piece and glue down on the board.

Gluing the second corner
Gluing the second corner

Next glue the second corner, the side of the unglued fabric, and fold down and glue. After both corners are glued as shown above put a bead across and pull the fabric taught and push into the bead. Glue other side.

Figure out where you want to place the self leveling picture hanger. As close to the middle is best. I hot glued mine on top of the folded over fabric. Once satisfied with the location put generous globs of hot glue on both ends of the hanger.

It is then ready to hang.

Horse framed and hung on the wall
Horse framed and hung on the wall

 

Painting wine glasses with a toddler!!

Sounds scary right? But it’s not since they don’t hold on to the glass. We had so much fun with this one! We did three different sets of glasses for Christmas presents this year. Below I’ll show you two of the 3 we did, a “Frozen” set and a “Deer” set. These could be modified for all other occasions as well, from graduation, weddings, birthdays, and even Valentines day.

Finished "deer" glasses
Finished “deer” glasses

What you will need:

    • A pair of glasses ( I got ours at the Dollar Tree)
    • Paint brushes
    • Cup with water for setting dirty paint brushes in
    • Wet wipes (for easy clean up)
    • Rubbing alcohol
    • Paper towel
    • Dish soap
    • A few Q-tips
    • Shaped foil stickers
    • Oven
    • Painters tape
    • Razor knife
    • Acrylic paint made for glass painting. I used these:

Plaid:Craft Martha Stewart Pearl & Metallic Acrylic Craft Paint Set-10 Colors

First, wash the glasses with dish soap and dry them well.

Second, tape the parts you don’t want paint on. I chose to tape off the stem of the glass and the rim.

Tape overlap did not line up
Tape overlap did not line up

Press the edge of the tape on tight so the paint won’t be able to seep under it.

TIP: the easiest way I found to tape the top rim is to hold the tape in one hand and slowly spin the stem so it just barely sticks to it. This was the best way I got the tape to stay at the same height around the rim.

TIP: If it doesn’t line up totally like in the picture above then use the sharp razor blade knife to trim it to your liking.

Put the glasses next to each other to line up the tape about the same height
Put the glasses next to each other to line up the tape about the same height

Put the glasses next to each other, to line up the tape on the second glass, to get the two to be about the same height.

After taping take a piece of paper towel and put some rubbing alcohol on it and wipe the area you will be painting. You want to make sure it’s totally clean or the paint wont stick as well and may chip off.

Different shaped foil stickers
Different shaped foil stickers

You want to use shaped foil stickers.

TIP: Notice that you will only see the outline of the sticker after you remove it from the glass. So if you look at the Santa stickers above, if I had used them when removing the stickers they would have only look like random blobs πŸ™‚

Stickers placed and ready to paint
Stickers placed and ready to paint

After cleaning your glasses place your stickers on as desired.

Ready to paint the "Frozen" glasses
Ready to paint the “Frozen” glasses

I would recommend sticking with two complimentary colors for painting with a toddler. For the “Frozen” glasses I chose two shades of blue.

Excited to paint!
Excited to paint!

For the “Deer” glasses I chose a green and blue paint.

Pure concentration
Pure concentration
Painting the "targets"
Painting the “targets”

It helps to tell your toddler to paint the “targets” (the stickers). You want to make sure that all sides of the stickers are covered in paint or their shapes won’t show up when removed.

Painting the "targets"
Painting the “targets”

When she got tired of one color I let her move on to the next. I didn’t wait for the paint to dry in between but allowed them to get mixed up.

Painted the "Frozen" glasses
Painted the “Frozen” glasses
All painted and ready to peel off stickers and tape.
All painted and ready to peel off stickers and tape.

Once they are painted, don’t allow the paint to completely dry before peeling the stickers and tape off (if it dries completely the paint may peel off with them). I pretty much started peeling the one that was painted first as soon as the second one was done with and I had Sophia cleaned off.

Very carefully peel the stickers off trying not to scratch off the paint around them.

What happens when you don't test the stickers first
What happens when you don’t test the stickers first

I didn’t think about how hard the snowflake stickers would be to peel off and they came off in tiny pieces, as you see above.

When you have them all peeled off, take your Q-tips and dip it in rubbing alcohol and wipe off the sticker residue and undesired paint that may have smeared on to the shapes left by the stickers.

Baking "Frozen" glasses
Baking “Frozen” glasses

Once you have the glasses cleaned off to your liking, follow the instructions on your paint for baking them. The Martha Stewart paint curing instructions said to place the glasses in a cold oven, heat the oven to 350F and bake 30 min and then leave in the oven until the oven has cooled off on it’s own. After that the glasses are finished, ready to use and top rack dishwasher safe.

"Frozen" glasses finished!
“Frozen” glasses finished!
Finished "deer" glasses
Finished “deer” glasses

(I have tissue in them so you can see the designs)